The Nature of Evil

 Posted by at 5:30 pm  DDO  Add comments
Jul 282015
 

The Eberron campaign setting, which DDO is mostly centered around, was created with the idea that “the creatures of Eberron are not bound by traditional alignment restrictions” (Eberron Campaign Setting, page 250). In game, this is seen rather frequently if players pay attention. An innocent kobold hires adventurers to find a peaceful method to remove hungry dogs from his sewers and into the fresh air. A paladin by the name of Oisin the Merciful attempts to kill adventurers on sight when said adventurers trespass upon the Hidden Chapel. Even a vampire can be found within the House Jorasco Enclave offering potions in exchange for necklaces.

However, as many of these examples exist, adventurers themselves are somewhat restricted. The racial options are, for the most part, limited to members of the traditional common races. There are exceptions, and these are the iconic races/classes, and the drow (I consider the warforged to be a common race). Other than that, many other intelligent creatures appear to be forbidden from owning the title ‘adventurer’. Although, to be fair, a few of said monsters may be too large or too powerful to be playable, save as an iconic class (possibly).

Alternatively, a few of the playable classes and class options would be fit for the path of darkness. Warlocks, for the most part, are centered around evil, being able to make pacts with fiends of the lower planes. The Pale Master enhancement line allows players to create undead to do their bidding, and even turn themselves into a zombie, vampire, wraith, or lich. Similarly, warforged and bladeforged clerics, paladins, and favored souls have the option to receive their divine magic from the infamous Lord of Blades, who has been appointed to end boss of a raid named after him (a divine caster could potentially kill their own deity. Just saying.). Drow have the option to worship the mysterious deity known as Vulkoor, whom scholars suspect is an aspect of the Mockery, one of the Dark Six.

I’ve provided my opinion, and some evidence. So, what do you people think? Should there be evil alignments? Playable monstrous races? A combination of the two? Or do you think the races, classes, and alignments are acceptable the way they are?

  7 Responses to “The Nature of Evil”

Comments (7)
  1. I’ve wanted playable Kobolds for years.

  2. Evil alignments should not be included in the game but playable monster races could happen someday. Kobold would be the most obvious choice but I hope that we get Gnomes first.

  3. Except that, in the LoB raid you don’t get to kill the LoB 🙂

    • Yep, just smack him around abit.. which is hilarious as a follower of the LoB
      “i’m sorry my lord”
      *thwack*
      “but..”
      *pow*
      “you really need..”
      *zop*
      “to pull yourself together!”
      *kapow*

  4. Perhaps. How would it be implemented, would there be Infamy, instead of Favor for them? Other than class restrictions would their be any game impact? What do you do with all the good aligned Pale Masters? Would there be party restrictions, e.g., no Pallys in a party with an evil character, or xp reduction for both if the do cooperate?

    I would rather see them add spear/javelin animations both thrown and melee, or quest givers that sought you out

  5. If an evil alignment were allowed, I would ask that the devs to reference real life to determine what the “cost” of said evil would exact from both the player and the characters around him. The greater the cost and hurdles involved, the more likely I would play it.
    Done well, I would try it once or twice but evil is something I just can’t intentionally do. No one thinks that they or their behaviour is seen as evil and I think a class that asked and gave the real consequences of being evil(rather than a candy coated image of evil) would anger many when they began to recognize some of their own behaviour in the build and then realize that they will suffer in-game. That said, some people really like chains and paddles without a safe-word. 🙂

  6. I did not know that, but now I do. I haven’t played the quest (actually, quite a few for that matter. Most of what I know are off the Wiki). Thank you for teaching me, and I apologize cor my ignorance.
    Edit: This was intended as a reply to Ausdoerrt.

What do you think?

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