Dec 302016
 

The formatting of this is all off – the only way I can retain the formatting is to take pictures of the document and then post the images. Which makes it harder to read. The final version will be a PDF and side-step all of that.

But I digress.

I finally rewrote the Monster Activation rules to include the new Quest Combat Board. They are more complicated than they were before, but then I added something so expecting the same level of simplicity is … silly.

Does this make sense to you? If you encountered this in a rules set, would you be able to piece together what to do?


Monster Activation

Monsters do not have “turns”, as no one is playing the Monster. Instead, they “Activate”, following a very specific set of logic to determine their actions. Some people like flowcharts, so here’s one for you all

 

 

First, if the Monster is Tapped, the only thing it can do is straighten. This Monster is done, move onto the next Monster For everyone else, here’s Monster Activation explained in regular words
Next, check the Monster’s Focus. If it doesn’t have any opponents in Focus, it performs no action. Move onto the next Monster A few Monsters have special text that executes when they have no Focus
Next, see if the Monster is in Melee distance of its Focus target Melee distance means in the same rank on the Quest Combat Board, or in an adjacent rank
If the Monster is in Melee distance

  • If it has Melee capability, the Monster will perform a Melee attack, comparing its MEL score to its opponent’s DEF just as would a Hero performing a Melee attack
  • Next the Monster will execute its Melee text, if it has any
  • Move onto the next Monster
 

A Monster has Melee capability if it has a number in the MEL combat value. Some have “N/A” and can never Melee

Melee text executes even if the Monster missed it’s Melee attack or did not even have Melee capability

If the Monster is not in Melee distance
  • The target is blocked if there are other Heroes or opponents in Melee distance
    • If the target is blocked, and the Monster has Melee capability, the Monster will advance one rank towards the target
    • If the target is blocked and the Monster does not have Melee capability, it will retreat one rank away from the target
Just like Heroes, Monsters may not perform a Ranged attack if there are any opponents in Melee distance

The Monster will try to get into a better position, advancing if it is a Melee monster, or retreating if it is not

  • If the target is not blocked, and the Monster has Range capability, the Monster will perform a Range attack, comparing its MEL score to its opponent’s DEF just as would a Hero performing a Melee attack
  • Next the Monster will execute its Range text, if it has any
  • Move onto the next Monster
Range text executes whether the Monster was blocked or not, whether it missed or not, even if it does not have Range capability

I have everything done, I think. I’ll post the whole PDF Monday, probably, unless something else comes up first.

That happens.

Sometimes I even play DDO and write about that

🙂 😀 🙂

  One Response to “DDO the Card Game: Monster Activation”

Comments (1)
  1. Ah, flowcharts – the ubiquitous tool of the programmer. I remember reading in a textbook something to the effect that “Advanced programmers can create programs without a flowchart.” And all of my classmates and I couldn’t help but laugh and remark that we must all be ‘advanced programmers’ since we could program without using a flowchart, even though this was one of our first classes in actual structured programming.

    As far as whether it makes sense and ‘being able to piece together what to do’ if found in a rules set, that would depend. I could follow it, yes, but then, I’m used to using flowcharts. So I think anyone who is familiar with flowcharts wouldn’t have any issues. For someone unfamiliar with flowcharts, I would *think* they should be able to follow it? Flowcharts are fairly well known, even by non-programmers and they are designed to be ‘easy’ to follow. Still, I’m sure there will be some who just don’t get it, without additional help. That said, if they can follow along with the actual rules, it should be fine. I suppose you could explicitly label the various steps in the rules and chart (i.e. step one – is monster tapped? [with a “1” or “step 1” in the first box on the chart]; step 1A – if “yes”, then straighten [with a “1A” in the ‘straighten’ box], and you’re done [you could give “done” the highest possible step number and reference it here, too]; step 1B – if “no”, then step 2 – does the monster have focus?…; etc.), though that’s probably unnecessary.

    😉

What do you think?

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